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Browse the entire SDRN website by theme here. Use the left sidebar to filter research and resources, events, calls, case studies and jobs by theme.

This new paper by FCRN member Elin Röös , the FCRN’s Tara Garnett and colleagues explores the following questions: What would be the implications, for land use and greenhouse gas emissions, if our global population moved away from eating beef and other ruminant meats and switched mostly to chicken? What if we all went vegan? What if all our meat demand were met by artificial meat?

Addressing the Meat Problem: What Role for the Social Sciences?

By Robert Lyons on 17th October 2017
Found in: Events
Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 12:00 to 17:00

Manchester

An event organised by the Sustainable Consumption Institute to showcase current research and develop stakeholder dialogue on the topic of meat consumption, non-meat consumption and sustainability. This half-day workshop will bring together academics working on meat-related research with organisations engaged in influencing food consumption to exchange knowledge and generate opportunities for future research

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UK Farming and the Environment Post-Brexit

By Robert Lyons on 17th October 2017
Found in: Events
Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 08:30 to 13:00

London

Taking place in the context of confidence levels and investment falling among farmers and six months on from the publication of the House of Lords Energy and Environment Sub-Committee report which investigated the implications of Brexit for UK agriculture and food, this forum will provide delegates with a timely opportunity to discuss and debate future priorities for the UK Agriculture sector and ensuring farming communities receive the support they need to thrive in a post-Brexit world.

Future of Farming Support in a Post-CAP Age

Grazed and confused?

By Robert Lyons on 4th October 2017
Found in: Research and Resources

A new report by the Food and Climate Research Network examines claims made by different stakeholders in the debate about so called ‘grass-fed’ beef, the greenhouse gases the animals emit, and the possibility that, through their grazing actions, they can help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 09:30 to 17:30

London

Innovate UK and the Knowledge Transfer Network are hosting this event which is aimed at supporting collaboration across the UK and Europe. It will promote funding opportunities available for food security, sustainable agriculture and forestry, marine, maritime and inland water research and the bioeconomy through Horizon 2020, the EU's largest research and innovation funding programme, with over €1 billion earmarked for calls in 2018-2020.

This paper in the Journal of Cleaner Production examines claims that buying 'local food' provides ecological, health and socio-economic benefits. A selection of 14 local and global food products in four sectors within four European countries. The paper finds that 'global foods' presented substantial advantages in terms of climate change mitigation and affordability to consumers.

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A new report by the International Institute for Environment and Development examines the impact of the palm oil industry, which has contributed significantly to the economic development of Indonesia and Malaysia, but has also caused widespread deforestation of ecosystems renowned for their biodiversity, as well as conflicts with indigenous peoples.

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Study finds deforestation in Latin America, insular South-East Asia (which include Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Timor Leste) and Madagascar derived low agricultural benefits and high environmental costs.

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This modelling study, published in Nature Plants, suggests that while climate change could have a serious adverse effect on current coffee-growing areas, a shift of production to uphill areas could increase production fourfold. 

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This thematic issue of Science for Environment Policy presents recent peer-reviewed research examining the impact of AES on European farming, with a particular focus on biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. AES have been shown to benefit a range of animals and plants by increasing the number of individuals and species. However, as with all measurements involving complex ecosystems, the findings and causal links are nuanced, and sometimes difficult to isolate.

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